Tag Archives: love

In Weakness I am Strong

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Ten years ago, I gave up my career as a publisher to be a stay-at-home mother. My first few years as a mother of three young children were, in a word, miserable. I was stunned by the unrelenting neediness of our children.

I had a non-Christian friend in a similar domestic situation, so we took turns talking each other down from the ledge. While we both were committed to the importance of staying at home with our children, my friend made it clear that all she could see in the sacrifices was pointless misery. Life would be great, she imagined, if those tedious and menial sacrifices were replaced with predictable pleasantness most of the time.

There’s only one problem with that line of thinking: with marriage and parenting, it’s all about the sacrifices.

As a Catholic, I know this. Theologically. But knowing the path and walking the path are different things. The truth is, I become angry, disappointed, or discouraged because my husband or children do not allow me to do what I want. I want a cup of coffee, but they want breakfast. I want to read a book, but I have to discipline someone. I want to go shopping, but my husband has to work overtime.

Would my life be more pleasant and easier if my children were always well-behaved or independent? If my husband always met my needs?. Of course. But would I be a better human being? Definitely not.

Unlike my friend, I know that the key to life is not pleasantness, but dying to selfishness. It’s hard to think of our desires as selfish, because we don’t see anything wrong with wanting a cup of coffee. And on its face, there isn’t. But we can easily pervert even a good desire. In my case, having coffee is a fine idea—until I allow my desire for it to take precedent over the needs of my family. Then the care I could have offered my family as their—and God’s—loving servant becomes instead a resentful obligation rendered by an embittered slave.

On the days when family life seems especially hard, it can seem like God sold us an oyster with no pearl. We hear the world whisper its opinion about our vocation and we begin to wonder if it’s really worth all the trouble to raise these kids or stick it out in this marriage. The burden can seem so heavy that it’s tempting just to set it down. It took me years to understand that I am not actually responsible for carrying this burden. All I really have to do is get my pride and selfishness out of the way and the Holy Spirit will gladly take over.

Unfortunately, there is no formula that will effect a final surrender to God, that will help you give up the “I can do this just fine on my own” once and for all. But the first step is changing the way we think about our vocation. We want to believe we’re strong enough, that we only need God to swoop in and give us a boost once in a while. And we can even get angry with Him when we do all the “right” things like go to Mass, pray the rosary, and read Scripture and STILL struggle. But the problem isn’t God, it’s us. It’s our desire for control and desire to indulge our own selfishness. When we really surrender to Him—not just minutes at a time, bookended by our own will—we are able to be the loving, patient, amazing wives and mothers He intends us to be.

Surrendering to God does not mean using prayer as a talisman, thinking that a rosary will give me saintly, adorable children. Or even that I can exchange Bible-reading time for super-human strength to endure. God gives us nothing less than his own life, his own strength, if we will take it. Those days when I am a truly loving, patient mother, it is not of my own strength, but God’s. In my surrender, I become weak…and freed from the chains of my rebellion, the Holy Spirit loves my children as I cannot on my own.

Giving up control and the love I have for myself is the most painful experience of my life and it is a battle I never saw coming when I entered my vocation. I finally understand why Jesus said that “whoever wishes to save his life will lose it; but whoever loses his life for my sake will find it.” When I surrender my will, and with it my sometimes all-consuming love of self, there is room for me to sacrificially and joyfully love others—and God.

In 2 Corinthians 12:9, St. Paul says,

And He has said to me, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is perfected in weakness.” Most gladly, therefore, I will rather boast about my weaknesses, so that the power of Christ may dwell in me.

For the sake of our families and ourselves, may Christ grant us women the grace to be weak. Only in surrendering to Him can we ever truly be free and “love one another as I have loved you.”

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Everything for the love of Him

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How can I cultivate my relationship with God more? That thought runs through my mind frequently- usually when I crash on the couch after a busy day of chasing my toddler, two dogs, doing housework… you know the drill. I’m often sheepish by the time bedtime rolls around at how little my mind has turned towards God- or, in the times it did, it was to whine petitions in His direction.

Oh sure, I have grand plans. “I’m going to start praying the Liturgy of the Hours!” I’ll tell myself. Or, “Every day at 3-o’-clock I will sit down and pray the Chaplet of Divine Mercy.” That… doesn’t always work out so well. How can we be in the world, fulfilling our vocations and still pursue God with the love and attention we ought? How can I change my mindset to “What can I do for You today, God?” from “This is what You can do for me today, God.” Brother Lawrence offers this solution:

People seek methods of learning to know God. Is it not much shorter and more direct to simply do everything for the love of Him? There is no finesse about it. One only has to do it generously and simply.

Cristo Redentor

Cristo Redentor

This… I love this. This I can do. I say “Everything for the love of Him” to myself like a day-long litany, trying to keep God in the forefront of my mind. My husband grabbed the wrong (scent-less?!) fabric softener at the store? Bite my tongue for the love of Him. My son is being whiny and I want to snap at him? Take time to be patient, for the love of Him. My friend had a bad day and wants to vent but I really don’t feel like listening? Take time for her, for the love of Him. And the list goes on and on.

I’ve found that when I’m doing things for the love of God- I’m not doing them for myself, or any perceived rewards that could kick back my way. It’s in this mindset that love has fertile ground to grow. Loving God (who is love) is a beautiful paradox- because the more love you give Him, the more love is available to you and in you for others. You withdraw love from your love account to give to Him, and find that your balance of love keeps getting higher. When you love someone, you care about what they care about. In my life, that’s fleshed out in surprising ways. When some lady cuts me off and I want to lay on my horn and mean-mug her when we get to the light, I remember that she’s someone really important to God, and I love Him. With that perspective, I’ve found the two great commandments (“Love the Lord your God with all your heart, soul and mind.” and “Love your neighbor as yourself.”) are realized. If she- or anyone, for that matter- is important enough to God that He came and died for her, who am I to be uncharitable?

Doing everything you do- no matter how small- for the love of God puts us into the mindset of a servant of all- which is what Jesus calls us to be. It’s not always easy, and it’s certainy not always fun, but on days when I really try (with varying success) to do everything for the love of God, by the time bedtime rolls around, my heart is overflowing with love for God and others. I have peace. My family is content. It’s not complicated, because it only requires one thing: dying to self.

I hope that one day (soon, God willing) I’ll be disciplined enough to pray the Liturgy of the Hours and daily Divine Mercy Chaplets. I hope that I’ll get better at carving time out of my day to turn my heart towards God and really listen for Him. In the meantime, I will try my hardest to do everything for the love of Him.

Mercy and Justice -or- My Perfect Confession

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+JMJ+

I’m Catholic and have been since birth.  My faith has always been part of the definition of me.  That being said, in May 2010 my world fell apart and the foundations of my faith cracked.

At 8:50 pm on May 26th 2010 my beautiful daughter Rita Marie was born.  She weighed 8lbs even and was 21 inches long.  She had a head of gorgeous black hair.  She was all me but for her nose and her hands – those were her daddy’s.

She was perfect.

But she wasn’t breathing.

A special ambulance came and rushed her to the local Children’s hospital.  There she stayed for two days.  She died in my arms when she was but 48 1/2 hours old.  I sang to her as she left us for Heaven and Life Everlasting.  Her daddy made sure of of her destination when, good Catholic man that he is, he baptised her as soon as it was evident she wasn’t breathing.

I’m so blessed to have a Saint in Heaven who is especially concerned for me and my family.  But I am also broken.  I have struggled greatly since Rita came and left us.  On the Feast of the Assumption I went to Confession for the first time in 10 months.  10 months is a long time for sin to build.  I didn’t even know where to start and I let Father know.  I was expecting to come out with a penance that would take me hours to complete but God surprised me with His Justice and Mercy.  He had just the right Priest waiting for me and cleared the line so that I could quickly duck into the confessional without having to wait for ages.

Without going into intimate detail of my fallen nature, Father said two things that stuck with me.   The first was that there are two parts to faith: the intellectual knowledge or understanding that God is Real and the trust that He wants good for us.  The second thing that stuck with me was my penance and the spiritual guidance received.  Respectively, to pray simply the prayer of St. Faustina “Jesus, I Trust in You.” a certain number of times and to say every day, as many times as needed, “Lord give me the light and grace to get through this day.”

I truly feel God’s love and mercy from that penance.  He knows I am already hurting and broken and chose to remind that I am His and that He loves me even when I am expecting Him to give me the spiritual equivalent of a good spanking.

I went into the confessional feeling like God had it in for me –  like I was His new Job – and came out feeling like Mary, sitting at Jesus’ feet.

Our God is both Merciful and Just.  He is perfectly both and measures each to us as we need.

Jesus, I Trust in You.